LA Art Show 2012

January 27, 2012 at 2:50 pm 3 comments

My last post covered the Los Angeles Fine Art Show (Jan 19-22, 2012). Now we turn our attention to the LA Art Show, the “other” show held simultaneously in the same location at the Convention Center. Confused? Never mind, it’s all art.

The LA Art Show, the subject of this post, was the modern & contemporary side. That means 20th and 21st century art. Much of it by artists who are still alive, some of them even quite young.

Let’s take a look:

LA Art Fair 2012 aerial view

LA Art Fair 2012

I enjoyed perusing the work in this booth (below), Denis Bloch Fine Art of Beverly Hills. Some famous names in there. Did you spot the Damien Hirst spot painting? They seem to be everywhere these days.

LA Art Fair 2012, Denis Bloch Fine Art

Speaking of spots, I did see quite a few dots this year. Perhaps it’s a trend? You know I’m all about the dots, right? So I do tend to notice them.

Here’s an example from a Korean artist, who overlays accent dots on top of traditional eastern landscape paintings. The twist is that the dots follow the underlying shapes but are intentionally offset a little, like when a printer mis-registers the different colors:

Hyun-Jae Chang, mixed media on linen, 50x50 cm Hyun-Jae Chang, untitled, 2011, mixed media on linen, 50×50 cm, $1,750. Offered by Chung Jark Gallery, Seoul, South Korea. Detail below, showing the offset dots.

Hyun-Jae Chang painting (detail)

I enjoyed this colorful arrangement of dot art by Justina Ko:

Justina Ko paintings Justina Ko monoprints, 15×11 inches each, shown by ECF Art Centers, Los Angeles.

Although I don’t much care for political Chinese art, I succumbed to the allure of Chairman Mao decorated with an overlaid grid of dots (you can see the dots in the detail view below). Reminded me of some of my own paintings where I put a grid of dots over an underpainting (like this one).

Liu Sheng, "Chairman Mao," 2011, acrylic on linen, 110x90 cm Liu Sheng, “Chairman Mao,” 2011, acrylic on linen, 110×90 cm. Shown by Hao Space, Guangzhou, China. Detail below.

Liu Sheng, Chairman Mao (detail)

Perhaps it’s a stretch, but this next painting struck me as one big dot made up of many little dots (dabs of paint, really, but I’m not picky):

Richard Pousette-Dart, Radiance (untitled), ca 1965-67, oil on canvas, 30x40 inches Richard Pousette-Dart, Radiance (untitled), ca 1965-67, oil on canvas, 30×40 inches, $350,000. Detail below.

Richard Pousette-Dart, Radiance (untitled) (detail)

Continuing with a circular theme, we have these delicate-looking constructions by Korean artist Hee-Kyung Kim:

Hee-Kyung Kim, "Bloom" series, 2011, Korean paper, 60x60cm to 90x90cm Hee-Kyung Kim, “Bloom” series, 2011, Korean paper, 60×60 to 90×90 cm, starting at $2,800. Offered by Art Company Misoolsidae, Seoul, South Korea.

What goes with dots? Stripes, of course! There were several flavors of stripes, but I especially liked these big colorful ones:

Tim Bavington, Susie Q and Susie Q (distortion) Tim Bavington, “Susie Q” and “Susie Q (distortion),” 2011, 64×64 inches each, synthetic polymer on canvas, $20,000 each. Offered by Jonathan Novak Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Is “synthetic polymer” a fancy way to say spraypaint?

More stripes:

John Waguespack, Hollywood Hills John Waguespack, “Hollywood Hills,” 30×40 inches, oil on canvas. Shown by The McLoughlin Gallery, San Francisco.

From the linearity of stripes we move to rectilinear geometry, created by carving patterns through layers of multi-colored acrylic paint. Most striking (and most easily seen) from an angle:

David Allan Peters, "Untitled #4," 2011, acrylic paint on panel, 60x48 inches. David Allan Peters, “Untitled #4,” 2011, acrylic paint on panel, 60×48 inches, $18,000. Sold (congratulations!) by exhibiting gallery Chandra Cerrito Contemporary, Oakland, California. Detail below:

David Allan Peters, "Untitled #4" (detail)

I’ve seen Peters’ work before and I’m always intrigued by the idea of carving through all those layers, like an archeological dig.

I’ll wrap up with this piece, also rectangular, though it seems just about ready to jump out of its geometric outline:

Matt Devine, "Ember #2," steel with red, 48x48x6 inches. Matt Devine, “Ember #2,” steel with red, 48x48x6 inches, $14,500. Offered by Madison Gallery, La Jolla, California.

Next stop: we venture across the street to the new Affordable Art Fair, which made its Los Angeles debut this year.

Entry filed under: Art Appreciation, LA Art Show, Shows.

Los Angeles Fine Art Show 2012 The Los Angeles Affordable Art Fair 2012

3 Comments


Barbara J Carter

I'm an artist. I make paintings with dots.

I work in acrylic paint, in a couple of distinct styles: landscapes and abstracts.

Native to California, I've lived elsewhere and only recently returned to my home state. I now live in Los Angeles.

I mostly show my art in outdoor festivals in California. I also occasionally show my work in art galleries or open studio events. You can see an up-to-date list of upcoming shows on my website (click here).

I invite you to sign up to receive my free email newsletter, in which I list my upcoming shows and talk about my latest work. I send it irregularly, a few times a year.

My links

My paintings

Follow me on Twitter: @barbarajcarter

Why I call my landscapes neo-Pointillist landscape paintings

A bunch of my abstract dot paintings

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 132 other followers

Feeds

Recent Posts

Newsletter Signup

Click here to receive my free email newsletter for up-to-date info on my shows, my art, and anything else that I'm up to. I send it out irregularly, a few times a year.

My latest Twitter tweets

Find Articles by Date


%d bloggers like this: